Is The Spanish Flu Still Around?

What was Spanish flu?

The Spanish flu, also known as the 1918 flu pandemic, was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic caused by the H1N1 influenza A virus.

Lasting from February 1918 to April 1920, it infected 500 million people – about a third of the world’s population at the time – in four successive waves..

How many people did the Spanish flu kill?

50 million peopleThe 1918 H1N1 flu pandemic, sometimes referred to as the “Spanish flu,” killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide, including an estimated 675,000 people in the United States.

How long did the Spanish flu last?

While the global pandemic lasted for two years, a significant number of deaths were packed into three especially cruel months in the fall of 1918. Historians now believe that the fatal severity of the Spanish flu’s “second wave” was caused by a mutated virus spread by wartime troop movements.

Was there a cure for the Spanish flu?

Fighting the Spanish Flu When the 1918 flu hit, doctors and scientists were unsure what caused it or how to treat it. Unlike today, there were no effective vaccines or antivirals, drugs that treat the flu. (The first licensed flu vaccine appeared in America in the 1940s.

What killed more black plague or Spanish flu?

During the Black Death Pandemic of the 1300s, plague (Yersinia pestis) killed 75 million to 200 million people, but the pandemic lasted longer than the Spanish flu, with the deaths spread out over more years.

When was the last case of Spanish flu?

Just two weeks after the first reported case, there were at least 20,000 more. The 1918 flu, also known as the Spanish Flu, lasted until 1920 and is considered the deadliest pandemic in modern history.

Is the Spanish flu extinct?

It is interesting to note that the H1N1 flu strain that caused the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic was extinct until very recently. This strain has been recently resurrected to allow for its scientific study and is closely guarded in a containment facility in Atlanta, Georgia.

How did the Spanish flu die?

It is estimated that about 500 million people or one-third of the world’s population became infected with this virus. The number of deaths was estimated to be at least 50 million worldwide with about 675,000 occurring in the United States.

Did Spanish flu mutate?

The influenza pandemic of 1918 was exceptional in both breadth and depth. … It is possible that a mutation or reassortment occurred in the late summer of 1918, resulting in significantly enhanced virulence. The main wave of the global pandemic, the “fall wave” or “second wave,” occurred in September–November 1918.

How many people did the Spanish flu kill in the United States?

675,000 peopleThe microscopic killer circled the entire globe in four months, claiming the lives of more than 21 million people. The United States lost 675,000 people to the Spanish flu in 1918-more casualties than World War I, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War combined.

Where did Spanish flu start?

While it’s unlikely that the “Spanish Flu” originated in Spain, scientists are still unsure of its source. France, China and Britain have all been suggested as the potential birthplace of the virus, as has the United States, where the first known case was reported at a military base in Kansas on March 11, 1918.

What was the worst outbreak in history?

The Worst Outbreaks in U.S. HistorySmallpox.Yellow fever.Cholera.Scarlet fever.Typhoid Mary.1918 H1N1.Diphtheria.Polio.More items…

Which plague killed the most?

the Black DeathThe most fatal pandemic in recorded history was the Black Death (also known as The Plague), which killed an estimated 75–200 million people in the 14th century. The term was not used yet but was for later pandemics including the 1918 influenza pandemic (Spanish flu).

What animal did the Spanish flu come from?

The 1918 influenza pandemic caused an estimated 50 million to 100 million deaths worldwide. The virus that caused the 1918 influenza pandemic probably sprang from North American domestic and wild birds, not from the mixing of human and swine viruses.

Is Spanish flu still around today?

Descendants of the 1918 influenza virus still circulate today, and current seasonal influenza vaccines provide some protection against the 1918 virus.