How Often Do Furnace Filters Need To Be Replaced?

Why is my furnace filter getting dirty so fast?

When your A/C is on the thermostat fan will constantly be running causing air too run over the air filter continuously and causing it to get dirty more quickly.

You may have a leak in your air ducts – Leaky air ducts can also cause your filter to clog up and especially if it is near your AC unit..

How long do furnace filters last?

A three to four-inch filter can last for six to nine months. If you have a thick five to six-inch filter, it can last from nine to twelve months. By making sure that your filters are changed when they need to be, you can enjoy having a heating and cooling system that will work its best.

How often should you change your furnace filter in the winter?

three monthsProfessionals, like our team at Airco Service, Inc. say that you should change your air filter at least every three months. During the winter, when you rely on your heating system more, you want to increase that frequency. During the winter, when the system is in constant use, change it out every month.

What happens if you don’t change your furnace filter?

If the air filter is not serviced often enough, it will eventually become clogged to the point that air cannot pass through it. When the furnace is operating, the lack of air flow will trap the heat in the system. … Without a new air filter, the furnace will overheat every time it starts up again.

How often should you change a 1 inch furnace filter?

In general, this is how often changing furnace filters needs to be done: For 1- to 2-inch filters, replace them every 1 to 3 months. For 3- to 4-inch filters, replace them every 6 to 9 months. For 5- to 6-inch filters, replace them every 9 to 12 months.

Is it better to use cheap furnace filters?

Cheap fiberglass filters are designed to stop dust, debris and hair from gunking up the system. While they do little to filter out allergens and other irritants, using them keeps your HVAC system clean and efficient. … They can add more resistance to airflow, which makes the system more expensive to operate.