Quick Answer: Why Was There A Big Change Between The Music Of The Medieval And The Renaissance Period?

How did humanism affect Renaissance music?

The influence of Humanism during the Renaissance period gave an enormous impact on the development of western music, where the revival in the study of Greek and Latin literature took place that result in new styles of music composed.

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What was the music like in the Baroque period?

Baroque music expanded the size, range, and complexity of instrumental performance, and also established the mixed vocal/instrumental forms of opera, cantata and oratorio and the instrumental forms of the solo concerto and sonata as musical genres.

What was the role of music during the Renaissance?

Music was an essential part of civic, religious, and courtly life in the Renaissance. … The most important music of the early Renaissance was composed for use by the church—polyphonic (made up of several simultaneous melodies) masses and motets in Latin for important churches and court chapels.

How would you describe baroque music?

Baroque music is a heavily ornamented style of music that came out of the Renaissance. … There were three important features to Baroque music: a focus on upper and lower tones; a focus on layered melodies; an increase in orchestra size. Johann Sebastian Bach was better known in his day as an organist.

What are two main characteristics of Renaissance music?

The main characteristics of Renaissance music are the following:Music based on modes.Richer texture in four or more parts.Blending rather than contrasting strands in the musical texture.Harmony with a greater concern with the flow and progression of chords.

How did the Roman Catholic Church influence music in the Middle Ages?

MIDDLE AGES (476-1400) The church (the Roman Catholic church) was the primary patron of art and education and the single greatest safe guarder of culture. All music, architecture, poetry and learning was cultivated by the church. Composers were churchmen and musicians got their training as church choirboys.

Why did medieval church music have such specific rules?

Because of these circumstances, medieval church music had very specific rules, including what was acceptable in chanting prayers. … The music itself was monophonic, meaning it was one melody without harmony, resulting in just one musical part. Monks would sing the prayers together in unison, so it sounded like this.

How did music change from medieval to Renaissance?

The medieval and Renaissance periods each witnessed a critical transition in the structure of Western music. During the Middle Ages, monophony evolved into polyphony (see Musical Texture). During the Renaissance, the shell harmony of the Middle Ages was succeeded by true harmony.

What is the main musical difference between the medieval and Renaissance period?

But when you listen carefully to enough of it, you will start being able to tell the difference between the two eras. Basically, medieval music will sound more jumpy and unexpected, and Renaissance music will sound more smooth and repetitive.

What were the major changes for music between the Middle Ages and Renaissance era during music and the new art in France?

The most prominent ways in which the music of the Renaissance is distinguishable from medieval music is a much smoother sound, more homogeneous, and less contrast The sound is changed as a result of a compositional technique. The new polyphony style replaced the highly contrasting lines of medieval polyphony.

How does the music of the baroque era compare to that of the Renaissance?

Whereas Renaissance era music placed little emphasis on tonality, Baroque era music used much more forceful and demonstrative vocals. … Baroque era composers, for example, Bach, Vivaldi, and Handel, were more expressive in their music than their predecessors.

Who are the composers of the Renaissance period?

The Top Famous Renaissance ComposersWilliam Byrd (1543–1623) William Byrd is perhaps the greatest English composer of all time. … Josquin Des Prez (1440–1521) … Thomas Tallis (1510–1585) … Pierre de La Rue (1460–1518) … Claudio Monteverdi (1567–1643) … Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina (1526–1594) … Orlando de Lassus (1530–1594) … Giovanni Gabrieli (1553–1612)