Question: Can Past Ability Examples?

Can you please or could you please?

“Could” is the polite form of “can”—so both are correct, but we use them in different situations.

We use “can” when we are telling someone to do something.

We use “could” when we are making a request.

Teacher to students: “Can you please be quiet!”.

Could VS was able to grammar?

1)According to ‘A Practical English Grammar’ by AJ Thomson et al, the one difference between could and be able to in the past affirmative is that could just implies that you had the general freedom or permission to do something, but may not have actually done or achieved it, where as be able to implies that you …

Was able to in a sentence?

Use it when you want to say that someone or something started (and completed) an action in the past: I was able to fix the faucet and now it’s fine. (In this sentence, the faucet was fixed sometime before the time being spoken of).

What is the difference between would and could?

But I would suppose that “would” is more polite, because it expresses the idea of probability, and of willingness, and of the desire that something be done, whereas “could” is more in the realm of ability (yes I can). And according to the American Heritage Dictionary, “would” is used to make a polite request.

What is the difference between were and we re?

“Were” is simply a plural past-tense form of the verb “are.” To talk about something happening now or in the future, use “we’re”; but to talk about something in the past, use “were.” If you can’t substitute “we are” for the word you’ve written, omit the apostrophe.

Can and could be a general ability?

Can and to be able to are usually used in the same way without a difference in meaning, but not always… ‘Can’ is a modal auxiliary verb that expresses general ability in the present tense; ‘could’ works the same way, but in the past tense. ‘To be able to’ is not a modal auxiliary verb.

Would past of Will examples?

We use would as the past of will, to describe past beliefs about the future: I thought we would be late, so we would have to take the train.

Can and could sentences?

‘can’ and ‘could’They could come by car. (= Maybe they will come by car.) … It can be very cold here in winter. (= It is sometimes very cold here in winter.) … That can’t be true. You cannot be serious.It’s ten o’clock. … It could be very cold there in winter. … They know the way here. … She can speak several languages. … I can see you.More items…

Can could tenses?

Can is called a modal verb. It doesn’t have all of the tenses that verbs usually have. It has the simple past tense could, but no past participle. When a past participle is needed, the expression be able to is used instead.

When to use was and were?

Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects. So, you will use “was” with I, he, she and it while you will use “were” with you, we and they.

When use can and could?

Can, like could and would, is used to ask a polite question, but can is only used to ask permission to do or say something (“Can I borrow your car?” “Can I get you something to drink?”). Could is the past tense of can, but it also has uses apart from that–and that is where the confusion lies.

Could for ability in the past?

“Could” is a modal verb used to express possibility or past ability as well as to make suggestions and requests. “Could” is also commonly used in conditional sentences as the conditional form of “can.” … past ability. You could see a movie or go out to dinner.

Was were able to examples?

We use was/were able to to talk about a specific event in the past. Examples: It was very windy last weekend so I could sail my boat very fast. Last Saturday evening it was raining so he didn’t go for a walk.

Can ability sentence?

We use can and can’t to talk about someone’s skill or general abilities:She can speak several languages. He can swim like a fish. … I can see you. Help! … She could speak several languages. I couldn’t see you. … She could have learned Swahili, but she didn’t want to. I could have danced all night. [

Can have been?

While Can’t Have (Been) is used to refer to an incident in the near past, Couldn’t Have (Been) is used for an event that happened way back in the past. When it comes to modal verbs — the verbs that express necessity or possibility — many learners find them rather confusing.